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10. Good Time

Ben and Josh Safdie’s breakthrough blazes across the screen for all of its 101 minutes, positioning the New York-based filmmaking brothers as the most exciting duo since the Wachowskis. Erstwhile “Twilight” leading man Robert Pattinson deftly reorients his career as bank robber Constantine Nikas. Full Review…

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9. Darkest Hour

Had star Gary Oldman languished underneath the makeup required to turn him into Winston Churchill, World War II pic “Darkest Hour” still arrived with enough punch, enough humor to survive. Blessedly, the make-up is faultless and Oldman’s performance enhances a surprisingly spirited period piece. Full Review…

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8. Dunkirk

Perhaps director Chris Nolan has yet to make his unmitigated masterpiece, but World War II pic “Dunkirk” is unmistakably his: an ingeniously structured, terrifically acted exercise in audiovisual tension that, experienced in 70mm IMAX, has the capacity to change one’s perception of the medium itself. Full Review…

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7. Phantom Thread

Paul Thomas Anderson’s opulent “Phantom Thread” is prone to puzzle in the moment, like waiting on the bloom of a peony you’ve only just planted. But with some water and sunlight, the film reliably grows in mind, paying dividends long after its end credits have come and gone. Full Review…

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6. Call Me By Your Name

Like “Phantom Thread,” “Call Me By Your Name” is the kind of unshakable potential classic whose sense of immersion extends well beyond its playing time. Not only does it establish star Timothée Chalamet as a talent to keep both eyes on, it reclaims Armie Hammer from the scrap heap of failed leading men experiments and suggests that we’ve had him wrong all along. Full Review…

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5. Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 2

Although not as bubbly or user-friendly as its predecessor, James Gunn’s sequel manages an incredible feat: it’s a narratively free-floating, visually sumptuous, grown-up comic book movie that exists in – and perhaps stands atop – the increasingly insipid Marvel Cinematic Universe. Coming on the heels of the bargain bin superhero tropes of 2016’s “Doctor Strange,” it’s nearly miraculous. Full Review…

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4. Coco

Disney•Pixar’s “Coco” missing out on a Best Picture nomination at this year’s Academy Awards is the snub no one is talking about. The rousing, heartrending film is one of Pixar’s very best and deserved to be the fourth animated movie nominated for the Oscars’ top honor (and the first since 2010’s “Toy Story 3”). Instead, it’ll have to settle for Best Animated Feature – and the hearts and minds of untold millions of moviegoers worldwide. Full Review…

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3. The Killing Of A Sacred Deer

Kicking off a decidedly dark and controversial top three, Yorgos Lanthimos’ follow-up to “The Lobster” is both devilish and demanding. The horror-thriller’s innately limited appeal only means more appeal for those into this sort of thing: a relentless headtrip where audiences are toyed with like a mouse cornered by a tabby. Full Review…

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2. Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

The vocal backlash to the moral ambiguity of “Three Billboards” (charges of racism have run rampant since the film’s release) has only reinforced precisely how raw and uncompromising the picture is. Martin McDonagh’s ink-black comedy-drama is determinedly messy, going out of its way to prod viewers. It succeeds wildly. Full Review…

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1. mother!

In what may sound like backhanded praise (it isn’t), Darren Aronofsky’s turbulent “mother!” is a shoo-in to be pored over by film students at the behest of their professors ad infinitum. The pic very nearly gave this writer a panic attack – and that was before the berserk third act. Dive in to the madness at your own peril – or pleasure. Full Review…

-J. Olson