10. Halloween

David Gordon Green’s “Halloween” may not be perfect, but it’s exactly the rough-and-tumble twenty-first century sequel that Carpenter’s film deserves. Somehow, the improbable combination of Green and McBride with an impassioned-as-ever Jamie Lee Curtis in tow has finally broken the series’ long tradition of disappointment. It turns out that if you’re Michael Myers, you can go home again. Full Review…

9. Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse

Directors Bob Persichetti, Peter Ramsey, and Rodney Rothman wield their animators’ wild talent like a flamethrower, leaving retinas pleasantly singed and optic nerves well-traveled. At the center: Miles Morales, who remains the heart and soul of the movie despite a bevy of spotlight moments for his newfound associates. (Juggling the emotional turbulence of our lead with a talking pig is quite a vault. The pic’s creative team lands it flawlessly.) Full Review…

8. Sorry To Bother You

You’ve seen parts of “Sorry To Bother You” before, like in Donald Glover’s admittedly Lynchian FX show “Atlanta” (also starring Stanfield), but never assembled like this. The whole is a gleaming signpost of an attention-worthy filmmaker that we didn’t know we had. Now we know. Full Review…

7. You Were Never Really Here

[Writer-director Lynne] Ramsay seems to know this kind of tragic figure better than most, transposing their suffering into something at once horrific and poetic. Such is the duality of human existence, wrapped up here in a celluloid bow. Full Review…

6. If Beale Street Could Talk

The cellos at the forefront of Nicholas Britell’s “If Beale Street Could Talk” score are more compelling than the entirety of most films. What happens when cues like “Eden (Harlem)” and “Agape” accompany a great film? One of the most revitalizing moviegoing experiences of 2018. Full Review…

5. The Favourite

Yorgos Lanthimos keeps stockpiling evidence that he’s one of cinema’s heavy-hitters, a legitimate once-in-a-lifetime talent who we need delighting and shocking us for decades to come. At its best, his newest feature is larger than life; the kind of spark plug period piece that only comes around once in a queen’s reign. Full Review…

4. Roma

“Roma” is that rare small, big film that engrosses entirely on its own terms, long and slow but full, painstakingly meted out by a filmmaker at the top of his game. Its reach will not be great as it should be. It’s liable to bore the pants off a great number of Netflix subscribers, and it may strike some Oscar voters as ponderous – or even impenetrable. Dive beneath the surface, though, and it’s anything but. Full Review…

3. First Man

The piece’s steadfast push-pull between macro and micro, between small steps and giant leaps, is too muted to elicit the kind of glowing takes that play on social media. But let it grow in mind and Chazelle’s virtuosic telling of the ne plus ultra of human discovery will leave its mark on you. Highly recommended. Full Review…

2. BlacKkKlansman

American racism may not have worn a white hood between 1979 and 2016, but it’s always lurked in the shadows, waiting for a populist voice to give it its grand re-entrance. Lee’s extraordinary film doubles as a visceral entertainment and an urgent reminder of a past we haven’t been able to shake. Full Review…

1. Eighth Grade

With the realism of “Boyhood” and without the affectedness of “Lady Bird,” “Eighth Grade” proves Burnham’s worth as a filmmaker just as he’s gotten started. In just over 90 minutes, he and Elsie Fisher evince, hand in hand, that they are genuine articles. That no matter the medium, Bo Burnham will thrive – on his own terms, of course. He’s made the best film of 2018. Gucci! Full Review…

-J. Olson